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122                                     Jack Fritscher, Ph.D.


            THE EVOLUTION OF LEATHER


                 BEGINNING AND ENDING THE LEATHER DECADE: THE 1970s

               •   September 30, 1970: The Presidential Commission on
                   Obscenity and Pornography releases its 646-page report
                   recommending that all sexually explicit movies, books, and
                   magazines should be legalized
               •   November 25, 1970: The Leather Decade of the 1970s
                   begins with the harakiri of Yukio Mishima, writer and soldier,
                   who  eroticised  leather, uniforms, bodybuilding, edge  play,
                   and homomasculinity
               •   July 10, 1981: The Leather Decade ends with the burning of
                   the Barracks Baths and Tony Tavarossi’s July 12 death from
                   a mystery disease at San Francisco General Hospital


            DRUMMER KEY TIMELINE: 14 TURNING POINTS
            WHEN, WHERE, AND WHY WHO AND WHAT CHANGED


            1. June 20, 1975. Drummer 1 premieres edited by Jeanne Barney and
            published by John Embry

            2. April 10, 1976. Great “Slave Auction” raid and arrests by gay-bashing
            LAPD in tactical “Operation Emancipation” run by Police Chief Ed
            Davis, 65 officers, one helicopter, one bus, and 40 victims

            3. December 1976. Editor in chief Jeanne Barney exits original-concept
            LA Drummer after completing Drummer 11 and parts of 12 and 13
            4. February-October 1977. Drummer makes desultory move from LA to
            San Francisco; Drummer 12 (February 1977) is first hybrid issue with
            both LA and San Francisco addresses on masthead
            5. March 1977. Embry hires Allen J. Shapiro (A. Jay) as art director and
            Jack Fritscher as editor in chief to change LA Drummer into San Francisco
            Drummer; beginning after Drummer 18 (August 1977), which Fritscher
            ghost-edited, Drummer takes four-month publishing hiatus, absent from
            the news stands and starting up again when Fritscher debuts his first
            issue, Drummer 19 (December 1977); the most representative, intense,
            archetypal, and perfect issue of Drummer in writing and graphic content

          ©Jack Fritscher, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved—posted 05-05-2017
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