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254                                     Jack Fritscher, Ph.D.
               By 1990,  homomasculinity  had jumped into gender studies’ use
            within the bear movement in which Ron Suresha coined ursomasculin-
            ity; Les Wright, Ph.D., pioneering men’s studies in ways similar to femi-
            nist approaches to women, female identities, and femininities furthered
            “homomasculinities” by studying “gay men identifying as men more than
            as gay” at his Nashoba Institute research site (bearhistory.com) and in his
            Bear Book: Readings in the History and Evolution of a Gay Male Subculture
            (1997), and Bear Book II: Further Readings (2001) with a timeline “Fore-
            word” explaining how the word bear became a homomasculine construct;
            homomasculinity and gaystream were both used by documentarian Ron
            Suresha in his Bears on Bears which included his Q&A titled “Bearness’s
            Beautiful Big Blank: Tracing the Genome of Ursomasculinity — An
            Interview with Jack Fritscher”; homomasculinity appeared in The Advocate,
            the “gay journal of record” in the article “Daring to Be Bears,” August
            20, 2002; it also debuted in the benchmark Village Voice (June 22, 2004)
            describing the life’s work of the legendary international artist Tom of Fin-
            land as the “artist whose drawings defined homomasculinity and S&M
            for the century”; Mary Louise Rasmussen and editor Eric Rofes — who
            was bearish, a professor, and part of San Francisco’s historical leather
            community — introduced  homomasculinity  to a new generation in the
            anthology, Youth and Sexuality, 2004.
                Homomasculinity  is a coinage easily illustrated in the manner of
            dictionaries where “one picture is worth a thousand words.” I have written
            about and published the homomasculine photographs of Robert Mapple-
            thorpe whose first ever magazine cover, previously mentioned, I commis-
            sioned, designed, and cast for the triumphal homomasculine “Biker for
            Hire” cover, Drummer 24 (September 1978). I have also promoted pho-
            tographers Arthur Tress in Drummer 30 (June 1979), Jim French (Colt
            Studio), Lou Thomas (Target Studio), Chuck Renslow (Kris Studio), Bob
            Mizer (AMG), and the man-defining films of the Gage Brothers, as well
            as the drawings of Tom of Finland, Rex, the Hun, and Domino. As a
            career photographer and videographer, I have shot and printed specific
            images of my interpretation of homomasculinity in magazine covers, cen-
            terfolds, and photo spreads as well as in my more than 160 feature-length
            homomasculine videos shot for Palm Drive Video since 1982 with box
            office at 250,000 units sold only in blue states. Doing the math: if four
            guys watched each unit sold . . . .  Palm Drive Video’s tag line is “Masculine
            Videos for Men Who Like Men Masculine.”
               Art critic Edward Lucie-Smith discussed the graphics of homomas-
            culinity in his “Introduction” to the fifty-five photos he chose from my
            portfolio for the coffee-table book titled Jack Fritscher’s American Men
            (Aubrey Walter, Gay Men’s Press, London, 1994). Lucie-Smith wrote:

          ©Jack Fritscher, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved—posted 05-05-2017
               HOW TO LEGALLY QUOTE FROM THIS BOOK
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