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Gay San Francisco: Eyewitness Drummer                347





                      Johnny Gets His Hair Cut


                 Written and produced March-April 1977, this photo-fea-
                 ture paragraph was published in Drummer 16, June 1977.
                 I.  Author’s Eyewitness Historical-Context Introduction
                    written March 22, 2002
                 II.  The photo-feature paragraph as published in
                    Drummer 16, June 1977
                 III. Eyewitness Illustrations


             I.  Author’s Eyewitness Historical-Context Introduction written
                March 22, 2002

             Producing both this Jim Stewart photo-feature squib in Drummer 16 as
             well as the Jim Stewart photo feature in Drummer 14, I was connect-
             ing Drummer, after its arrival in San Francisco, with new local talent
             (such as photographer Jim Stewart) and into established local talent (such
             as author Sam Steward). Reducing the six degrees of separation among
             potential contributors was what publisher Embry had hired me to do to
             fill Drummer. Through naming me “founding San Francisco editor in
             chief,” the newly arrived Embry meant that I was to be his San Francisco
             talent scout discovering a new group of contributors, ideas, and themes
             for Drummer orphaned in LA.
                Jim Stewart and I had been friends since 1973. When he moved from
             Kalamazoo, Michigan, to San Francisco in October 1975, he lived with
                                                     th
             me and my lover David Sparrow at our home on 25  Street.
                Out of the Folsom Street leather culture of the 1960s which focused
             on motorcycles and bars, in the early 1970s we began fashioning a kind
             of SoMa salon around art in which the motorcycle changed from trans-
             portation to icon, and our leather chaps and jackets morphed from safety
             clothes to fetish gear. In the early 1970s, beer was 15-cents, pot was $5
             a lid, and a comfortable room for rent cost $20 per week. I was thirty,
             happy, and in love with David Sparrow who became my photography
             partner at Drummer. It was our leather Boheme. South of Market was
             glorious. Our new scene was the end of beatniks and hippies and the
             beginning of gay men. Peace, love, and granola gave way to sex, drugs,
             and rock-n-roll. By 1977, our decade-long sex-orgy fraternity of leather
             easily flowed into our Drummer salon.
           ©Jack Fritscher, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved—posted 05-05-2017
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