Page 487 - Gay San Francisco_Eyewitness Drummer
P. 487

Gay San Francisco: Eyewitness Drummer                467
                    . . . .We feel that suits, ties, sport jackets, sweaters, fur coats,
                sparkles, spangles, and dresses have a place in gay society, but
                it ain’t here.
                Richard Goldstein was a lickety-lickety crusader of the correct. He
             seemed to have a special hatred for the Mineshaft and for Rex. He got
             his buzz poking his stick into the gay beehive. He specialized in anti-
             leather, anti-S&M, anti-fisting articles, such as “Flirting with Terminal
             Sex” which continued his cautionary rant begun in “S&M: The Dark Side
             of Gay Liberation,” in the Village Voice, July 7, 1975.
                Goldstein hit a diva’s high note that shattered glass.
                Timing is everything.
                Seventeen days before the Village Voice published Goldstein’s article,
             Drummer had published its first issue June 20, 1975.
                Objective corollary: seven weeks before  Drummer  was first pub-
             lished — that is, while the first issue was being written and edited, the
             Vietnam war, which drove draft-age gay men to excess to stay alive, ended
             on April 30, 1975, as helicopters lifted the last Marines off the rooftop of
             the American embassy in Saigon.
                Never underestimate the pervasive violence of the Vietnam war, and
             the resistance to it, on the psyche of gay men in the Titanic 70s. Queer
             scholarship needs to address this unspoken nexus between war and hedo-
             nism.
                If, as an eyewitness participant, I made  Drummer  homo-aggro
             (aggressive), particularly in my editorials (eg.: Drummer 24, September
             1978) and in my hard-hitting “resistance” themes of  masculinity  and
             homomasculinity, it was part of my stance against anti-leather queens like
             Goldstein who in 1975 was the first voice I heard of the politically correct
             who later abducted gay culture when it was brought to its knees by HIV,
             and thus made so very vulnerable to hostile take over.
                About Hollywood, Katharine Hepburn famously said, “Most people
             in this profession are pigs.” About the politically correct in publishing and
             academia, I’d say the same thing. I have withstood the PC pigs for thirty
             years and I will rejoice when their politically correct fad fully fades like
             the Marxism whose bastard it is.
                I suspect that at this moment most leatherfolk are yet as unaware of
             Goldstein’s pioneering anti-leather, anti-edge rants as they were unaware
             of the Life (June 26, 1964) article which I was the first to “out” to the
             attention of leather history in Drummer 134 (October 1989). That was
             the issue on the stands during the huge Loma Prieta earthquake, 5:04
             PM, October 17, 1989, that wiped out the Drummer office, demoralized



           ©Jack Fritscher, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved—posted 05-05-2017
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