Page 184 - Gay Pioneers: How Drummer Shaped Gay Popular Culture 1965-1999
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166      Gay Pioneers: How Drummer Shaped Gay Popular Culture 1965-1999


            inside Embry’s camp version of Drummer, changing the core magazine from
            Los Angeles Drummer to the San Francisco Drummer that became an inter-
            national best seller. Robert Mapplethorpe, who disliked Embry, told me that
            our editorial maneuvering around Embry was the same tactic that editors
            Fred Hughes and Glenn O’Brien used to maneuver their creation of “Andy
            Warhol’s Interview Magazine,” minus Andy, who was as much a headache at
            Interview as Embry was at Drummer where Embry was no Warhol.

            A ROOM OF ONE’S OWN:
            CAN WHAT IS WHISPERED BE WRITTEN DOWN?


                           Sometimes iconoclasm is a good thing.
                             Sometimes a memoir is a portrait
                                  in a fun house mirror.
                              Sometimes it pays to investigate
                                     where truth lies.
                                Sometimes it’s wise to dare
                              to wear one’s trousers rolled, and
                                      to eat a peach,
                                because in the empty rooms
                                  the queers come and go
                              speaking of Michael and Angelo.


            THE BIAS BETWEEN EAST COAST AND
            WEST COAST CULTURE


                               The Geography of Drummer
                         Imagine Drummer as a New York magazine?
                        It couldn’t make it as a Los Angeles magazine.
                                San Francisco was its spot.

            During the first ten issues of Drummer, my friend James Purdy, author of
            the S&M literary classic, Eustace Chisholm and the Works (1967), sent a short
            story to Jeanne Barney. Like his longtime friend, Sam Steward, the genius
            Purdy, though lionized by Edith Sitwell and Gore Vidal, was always rather
            the redheaded stepchild sniffed at by the East Coast literary establishment.
            As with Sam Steward, I told James Purdy that Drummer might be a suit-
            able way to reach his underground fan club—that is, until the day James
            Purdy telephoned editor Jeanne Barney with the bad news, he said, that
            his New York agent thought publication in the outre Drummer would be a


              ©Jack Fritscher, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved—posted 03-16-2017
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